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Minnesota marketplace highlights buy viagra online canada and updatesOpen enrollment for can a 17 year old take viagra 2021 health plans. November 1, buy viagra online canada 2020 through December 22, 2020. Residents with qualifying events can still enroll or make changes to their 2020 coverage.Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three straight years of average rate decreases. Quartz has joined the exchange buy viagra online canada for 2021, bringing total number of insurers to five.117,520 people enrolled for 2020, a new record for MNsure.Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014 to 2021.Reinsurance program received federal approval, began operation in 2018.With reinsurance, rates decreased for 2018 and again, even more significantly, for 2019.

But reinsurance also reduced funding for MinnesotaCare.The elimination of CSR funding further reduced MinnesotaCare funding, but this has been partly restored by a court ruling.MN provided premium relief for non-subsidy-eligible enrollees for 2017 only.Governor vetoed a proposed 2019 switch to HealthCare.gov.MNsure’s small business exchange no longer has any participating buy viagra online canada insurers.Minnesota health exchange overviewMinnesota’s one of the states fighting the hardest to preserve the Affordable Care Act’s gains. See actions Minnesota has taken.Minnesota’s state-run exchange, MNsure, has five participating insurers for 2021, up from four in 2020. The exchange has more than buy viagra online canada 117,000 individual market enrollees as of 2020.As a result of the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra, MNsure joined most of the other state-run exchanges in offering a special enrollment period during which people who were uninsured could enroll in a health plan. MNsure’s special enrollment period began March 23, and continued through April 21. Nearly 9,500 Minnesota residents enrolled in private plans through MNsure during this window, as well as another 13,700 who enrolled in MinnesotaCare or Medicaid (enrollment in those programs is open year-round for eligible residents).Allison O’Toole, who led MNsure as CEO for buy viagra online canada three years, announced her resignation in March 2018, and the exchange named Nate Clark, the MNsure COO, as acting CEO.

A few months later, the MNsure board named Clark as the permanent CEO. O’Toole left MNsure to work as director of buy viagra online canada state affairs for United States of Care, a non-profit created by Andy Slavitt, who was the acting administrator of CMS under the Obama Administration.Throughout 2017, Minnesotans who bought their own health insurance (on or off-exchange) and weren’t eligible for ACA subsidies were provided with 25 percent premium rebates from the state as a result of S.F.1, signed into law by Governor Dayton in early 2017. The subsidies helped to offset the large premium increases that applied in Minnesota in 2017, and helped to stabilize the individual health insurance market in 2017. But the premium rebate program expired at the end of 2017.Thanks in large part to the new reinsurance program that Minnesota created (details below), premiums decreased in Minnesota’s individual market in 2018, 2019, and again in 2020, although rates are buy viagra online canada increasing modestly for 2021. In May 2019, Minnesota leaders reached an agreement on a budget that included an extension of the reinsurance program through 2020 and 2021 (it has already been granted federal approval through the end of 2022, but the state has to continue to cover its share of the cost.

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz had hoped to implement a premium buy viagra online canada subsidy program and a new tax credit in Minnesota starting in 2020. But a compromise in the budget ended up with the state opting to continue the existing reinsurance program for two more years instead.).But the waiver that provides federal pass-through funding for reinsurance also resulted in a sharp and unexpected decrease in federal funding for MinnesotaCare, the Basic Health Program that provides coverage for people with income between 138 percent and 200 percent of the poverty level (between $16,642 and $24,120 for a single person).In addition, the elimination of federal funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSR) in October 2018 resulted in a funding cut for MinnesotaCare, since the program is funded in large part by federal funds that would otherwise have been used to pay for premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions in the exchange for the population that is instead eligible for MinnesotaCare. After an ensuing legal battle, a judge ordered HHS to restore funding for MinnesotaCare, although a buy viagra online canada resolution of the situation is ongoing, and the amount that HHS agreed to pay was still less than MinnesotaCare would have received if CSR funding had continued.Open enrollment for 2021 health plans extended through December 22, 2020. Insurers implementing modest rate increases for 2021, after three years of overall rate decreasesMNsure enabled window shopping for 2021 health plans as of October 12, 2020. This gives residents a few weeks to browse the available plans before open enrollment starts on November 1, buy viagra online canada 2020.

And MNsure has announced that open enrollment will continue through December 22, 2020. That’s a week longer than the open buy viagra online canada enrollment period that will apply in states that use the federally-run exchange. The flexibility to extend open enrollment is often cited as one of the benefits of having a fully state-run exchange. (MNsure had a similar extension last December, for 2020 health plans).For 2021, Quartz is joining the buy viagra online canada Minnesota marketplace. Quartz currently offers plans in Illinois and Wisconsin, and is expanding into Minnesota for 2021.

And two of the existing insurers — HealthPartners and UCare buy viagra online canada — are expanding their coverage areas for 2021 (BluePlus and Medica offer coverage statewide, and will continue to do so in 2021).The following average rate changes have been approved for MNsure’s insurers:Blue Plus. 4.21 percent increase (down from an initially proposed 7.12 percent increase)Group Health/Health Partners (GHI). 0.67 percent increase (down buy viagra online canada from an initially proposed 4.15 percent increase)Medica. 2.42 percent increase (down from an buy viagra online canada initially proposed 7.06 percent increase)UCare. 1.6 percent increase (up from an initially proposed 1.39 percent decrease)Quartz.

New for 2021, so no applicable rate changePreferredOne Insurance Company, which offers plans outside the exchange, is increasing premiums by buy viagra online canada 1.05 percent (down from an initially proposed average increase of 5.09 percent). Rate changes in previous years2015. Average increase of 4.5 percent buy viagra online canada. MNsure critics characterized the official announcement as misleading as it failed to take into account low-cost 2014 plans from PreferredOne. Consumers who bought a PreferredOne plan buy viagra online canada through MNsure for 2014 could only renew their policies for 2015 by working directly with the insurer, since PreferredOne stopped offering plans in the exchange at the end of 2014.

However, PreferredOne rates went up an average of 63 percent, and consumers didn’t qualify for subsidies if they shopped outside the exchange. 2016. Average increase of 41.4 percent for the individual market, and about 38.5 for plans sold in MNsure (ie, not counting PreferredOne). Rates increased significantly in 2016 across the entire individual market in Minnesota — including plans sold through MNsure, the state-run exchange.Approved rates for 2016 were announced on October 1, 2015, ranging from about 15 percent for Medica to 49 percent for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. In general, the carriers cited higher-than-expected claims costs over the past year, along with the impending phase-out of the ACA’s reinsurance program as justification for their 2016 rate requests.

But Governor Mark Dayton called some of the higher proposed increases “outrageous,” and promised a rigorous review of the filed rate changes and justifications. Ultimately, regulators were able to limit the highest rate increases to 49 percent — as opposed to the 54 percent that had been requested by Blue Plus and BCBS of MN — but the final weighted average rate increase in the individual market in Minnesota still ended up being the highest in the nation. But Minnesota still had the lowest overall premiums in the upper midwest (although Minnesota had the highest average rate increase in the country for 2016, they had the lowest overall rates in the country in 2014 and 2015).Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman called the rate increases “unacceptably high,” and Gov. Dayton noted that he was “extremely unhappy” with the rate changes. But Rothman noted that his office “objected to all of the rates across the board,” and “squeezed out everything we could that was not actuarial justified.” In other words, the final rates, although much higher than officials and policyholders would have liked, were justified based on medical claims costs — the population enrolled in individual health plans in Minnesota was sicker than expected, and drug costs had been particularly onerous.Only about 55 percent of people who had 2015 coverage through MNsure received premium subsidies.

But due to the sharp premium increases, that had increased to about 63 percent for the people who had purchased or renewed coverage as of June 2016.2017. When the Minnesota Department of Commerce announced health insurance rates for 2017 for the individual and small group markets, the rate hikes were somewhat reasonable in the small group market (ranging from a decrease of 1 percent to an increase of 17.8 percent), but the individual market was “experiencing serious disruptions in 2017” and “on the verge of collapse.” The four carriers that offered plans through MNsure had the following average rate increases in 2017:Blue Plus = 55 percentHealthPartners/Group Health (GHI) = 50 percent (HealthPartners is only offering plans in 10 of the 67 counties where they offered plans in 2016. Their enrollment cap is 72,000 for 2017)Medica = 57.5 percent (enrollment cap is 50,000 for 2017)UCare = 66.8 percent (UCare capped enrollment at 30,000 for 2017, but only had 16,000 enrollees in 2016)The enrollment caps that HealthPartners, Medica, and UCare employed for 2017 were approved as part of the rate review process, and are designed to protect carriers from further financial losses as they absorb BCBSMN’s enrollees who are shopping for new coverage during open enrollment.In a news release relating to the rate announcement for 2017, the Minnesota Department of Commerce didn’t mince words. They noted that the individual market in the state was on the brink of collapse, and that they did everything in their power to save the market. While they succeeded in keeping the state’s individual market viable for 2017, with only one carrier exiting (BCBSMN, although their HMO affiliate, Blue Plus, remained in the exchange), they reiterated very clearly that substantial reforms would be needed to keep the market stable in future years, and highlighted the fact that rates would be sharply higher and that carriers would limit enrollment in 2017.2018.

Final rates for 2018 were approved in October 2017 (comprehensive information about the approved rates is here), based on the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MSPS) being implemented but cost-sharing reductions (CSR) not being funded by the federal government (the cost of CSRs was added to on-exchange Silver plans). Average approved rate changes for MNsure insurers ranged from a 13.3 percent decrease for UCare to a 2.8 percent increase for Blue Plus. Three of the four MNsure insurers decreased their average premiums for 2018.On September 21, MNsure had posted a notice indicating that if the reinsurance program were not approved, rates would be about 20 percent higher than they would otherwise be in 2018. Fortunately for Minnesota residents, the reinsurance program did receive federal approval, and average rates declined slightly for 2018.But some enrollees who don’t get ACA premium subsidies still experienced a rate increase, due to the termination of the one-year, state-funded 25 percent premium rebates at the end of 2017.PreferredOne, which exited MNsure at the end of 2014 and only offers coverage in the off-exchange market, proposed dramatically lower rates for 2018. A 38 percent average decrease if MSPS were to be approved, and a 23 percent average decrease if not.

The 38 percent decrease was implemented, and no adjustments were necessary to account for CSR funding, since PreferredOne does not offer plans in the exchange, and CSRs are only available on silver exchange plans.2019. Average premium decrease of 12.4 percent. Average premiums dropped for all five insurers in the individual market in 2019. This was the second year in a row of declining rates in Minnesota, but Blue Plus had a small rate increase for 2018, so 2019 was the first year that all five insurers decreased their average rates. Minnesota insurance regulators noted that rates in 2019 were about 20 percent lower than they would have been without the reinsurance program.But most of Minnesota’s insurers charged higher rates in 2019 than they would have if the individual mandate penalty hadn’t been eliminated, and if access to short-term plans and association health plans hadn’t been expanded by the Trump administration.

For example, UCare’s rate filing notes that while average rates were decreasing by about 10 percent, the rate decrease would have been nearly 15 percent if the individual mandate penalty had remained in place.At ACA Signups, Charles Gaba calculated a weighted average rate decrease of 12.4 percent for 2019 in Minnesota, but noted that the average decrease would have been nearly 19 percent without those changes at the federal level.2020. Average premium decrease of 1 percent. Four of the five insurers (including PreferredOne, which only offers coverage off-exchange) in Minnesota’s individual market decreased their average premiums for 2020. This was the third year in a row that average individual market premiums dropped in Minnesota’s individual market, due in large part to the reinsurance program that the state has established.The following average rate changes were implemented for 2020:Blue Plus. 1.5 percent decrease (Blue Plus had originally proposed a 4.8 percent increase)Group Health/Health Partners (GHI).

1.26 percent decrease (GHI had originally proposed a 2.1 percent increase)Medica. 1.01 percent decrease (Medica had originally proposed an average decrease of 1.4 percent)UCare. 0.18 percent increase (UCare originally proposed a 0.3 percent increase)PreferredOne, which only offers off-exchange coverage, reduced their rates by an average of 20 percent, on the heels of an 11 percent decrease in 2019. MNsure enrollment exceeded 116k in 2018, dropped to 113k for 2019, but grew to more than 1117k in 2020From 2014 through 2018, enrollment in MNsure’s individual market plans increased every year, reaching 116,358 people by 2018. That was the highest open enrollment total in MNsure’s history, despite the shorter enrollment period, which ended in mid-January instead of the end of January (open enrollment for 2018 coverage ended on December 15, 2017 in states that use HealthCare.gov, but MNsure opted to extend their enrollment window that year, and have also extended subsequent enrollment windows).Enrollment dropped for the first time in 2019, when 113,552 people enrolled in individual market plans through MNsure.

In most states that use HealthCare.gov, enrollment peaked in 2016 and has been dropping since then. But MNsure’s drop-off in 2019, which amounted to only a 2.4 percent reduction in enrollment, is the only time year-over-year enrollment has declined. Notably, the ACA’s individual mandate penalty was eliminated as of 2019, and regulations that the Trump administration implemented in late 2018 now make it more feasible for healthy people to use short-term plans instead of ACA-compliant plans (Minnesota has its own rules for short-term plans, but they’re more relaxed than the Obama-era federal rules that applied in 2017 and most of 2018).And for 2020, enrollment grew again, reaching a record high of 117,520 enrollees.Here’s a look at the number of people who have signed up for individual market plans through MNsure during each year’s open enrollment period. These numbers all represent total enrollment at the end of open enrollment. Effectuated enrollment is always lower, and MNsure provides periodic effectuated enrollment data on their board meeting materials page.

Insurer participation in MNsure. 2014-20212014. Five insurers offered individual policies through MNsure for 2014. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, HealthPartners/Group Health, Medica, PreferredOne, and UCare. Kaiser Health News reported that Minnesota offered some of the lowest premiums for silver (mid-level) plans in the U.S.

Four of Minnesota’s nine regions made Kaiser’s list of the 10 least expensive places to buy health insurance.2015. But PreferredOne, which offered the lowest rates in the nation in 2014 and captured a large portion of 2014 enrollees, withdrew from MNsure for 2015. PreferredOne said remaining on the exchange was “not administratively and financially sustainable.” A Star Tribune business writer attributed PreferredOne’s departure as a market dynamics issue rather than a problem with MNsure.However, Blue Plus (an affiliate of Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN, offering HMO plans) joined the exchange for 2015, so there were still five insurers offering plans for 2015. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare. MNsure offered 84 plans statewide, up from 78 for 2014.2016.

BCBSMN, Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, Medica, and UCare offered individual market plans through MNsure for 2016.2017. In an effort to recruit more carriers to offer plans through MNsure for 2017 — particularly outside the Twin Cities metro area — state regulators sent out a request for proposals from health insurers on August 15, 2016. Regulators noted that insurers could propose waivers of regulations in order to make it feasible for them to offer coverage through MNsure, although any such waiver requests would have to be approved by regulators.Steven Parente, a health insurance expert at the University of Minnesota, called the state’s effort to recruit insurers to MNsure a “distress call” and noted that August 15 is awfully late in the year to be putting out a request for insurer participation, given that open enrollment begins November 1. And ultimately, no new insurers opted to join MNsure for 2017.Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2016 due to significant financial losses. That left Blue Plus (which offered HMOs and covered roughly 13,000 people in 2016 in the individual market) as the only BCBSMN affiliate in the exchange.

Roughly 103,000 people had to select new plans during open enrollment.Most of those BCBSMN enrollees had off-exchange coverage, though. There were only about 20,400 MNsure enrollees (a little more than one in five MNsure enrollees) with coverage under BCBSMN who needed to switch to another plan during open enrollment. BCBSMN had individual PPO options available in all 87 counties in Minnesota through MNsure in 2016, while the Blue Plus coverage area — comprised of four separate HMO networks — was available in 77 of the state’s counties.Nationwide, carriers have been shifting away from PPOs and towards HMOs and EPOs. In Colorado, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield also dropped their PPOs at the end of 2016. In Indiana, there were no PPOs available in the individual market by 2017.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico dropped all of their individual market plans at the end of 2015 except one off-exchange HMO. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas dropped their individual market PPO plans at the end of 2015.The broad network offered by PPOs tends to be attractive to enrollees who have health problems. They’re often willing to pay higher premiums in trade for access to broad network of hospitals and specialists. But PPOs are expensive for carriers, as enrollees don’t need primary care referrals to see specialists, and it’s more challenging for carriers to hold down costs when there are more providers in the network.All of the MNsure carriers except Blue Plus are also limiting their total enrollment for 2017. By November 11, 2016, less than two weeks into open enrollment for 2017 coverage, Medica had hit their 50,000 member enrollment cap for 2017 (including on and off-exchange enrollments, and also accounting for expected renewals of 2016 Medica plans), and their policies were no longer available in the individual market in Minnesota, on or off-exchange.

The only exception was five counties (Benton, Crow Wing, Mille Lacs, Morrison, and Stearns) where Medica agreed not to limit enrollment, as all of the other available carriers in those counties have imposed enrollment caps too. In those five counties, Medica plans continued to be available.At that point, Medica’s market share in MNsure for 2017 stood at 34.2 percent. By December 14, Medica’s market share had dropped to 27.7 percent, as enrollments had continued to climb for the remaining carriers.On January 31, Medica re-opened enrollment for 2017. This was because a smaller-than-expected number of 2016 Medica enrollees renewed their plans for 2017, meaning that the carrier still had some wiggle room under their 50,000 member cap. At that point, they had room for about 7,000 more enrollees.

Medica plans were thus available throughout the duration of the special enrollment period that was added on at the end of open enrollment, and continue to be available for people with qualifying events.2018. Plans continued to be available from Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health (GHI), Medica, UCare. In the months before a decision was reached regarding an extension of the open enrollment window for 2018 plans (the first year that the federal government imposed a shorter, month-and-a-half enrollment window), two of MNsure’s participating insurers had differing positions. UCare believed the exchange should add an additional two-week special enrollment period, while Medica did not want the exchange to have the option to extend the newly-scheduled six-week enrollment window. Notably, Medica capped their enrollment very early during the 2017 open enrollment period, and while UCare also had an enrollment cap, it was set with a target of nearly doubling their 2016 enrollment.

But Medica is the only MNsure insurer that didn’t set an enrollment cap for 2018.As was the case for 2017, enrollment caps were used in the individual market in Minnesota for 2018 by all insurers other than Medica (Medica did have an enrollment cap for 2017, which they hit very early in open enrollment. However, they resumed enrollments at the end of January 2017). Details about the insurers’ enrollment caps are in the plan binders in SERFF. For 2018, MNsure insurers implemented the following enrollment caps:Blue Plus. 55,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 50,000 effectuated enrollees, but effectuated enrollment is always lower than the number of people who initially enroll)Health Partners/Group Health (GHI).

73,400 member cap (aiming for a target of 70,000 effectuated enrollees)Medica. No enrollment capUCare. 35,000 member cap (aiming for a target of 30,000 effectuated enrollees)MNsure confirmed in May 2018 that none of their insurers had hit their enrollment caps for 2018.Outside the exchange, PreferredOne had an enrollment cap of 3,000 members, although their 2017 membership was only about 300 people.2019 and 2020. Blue Plus, Health Partners/Group Health, UCare, and Medica have continued to offer plans through MNsure, and all of them continued to participate in 2020 as well. Blue Plus expanded to once again offer statewide coverage in 2020, for the first time since 2016.2021.

Quartz joined the exchange for 2021, joining the four existing insurers. HealthPartners and UCare are both expanding their coverage areas for 2021.Minnesota Premium Security Plan. 1332 waiver proposal approved by CMS, but with a significant funding cut for MinnesotaCareIn May 2017, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton submitted a 1332 waiver proposal to CMS. The 1332 waiver was based on H.F.5, which was enacted without Dayton’s signature in April 2017 (Dayton had proposed an alternative measure that would have allowed people in Minnesota to buy into MinnesotaCare. That measure was not able to pass the state’s Republican-dominated legislature).[For more than two decades, MinnesotaCare was a state program subsidizing health insurance for low-income residents.

As of January 1, 2015, it transitioned to a Basic Health Program under the ACA, becoming the first BHP in the nation.]H.F.5 created the Minnesota Premium Security Plan (MPSP), which is a state-based reinsurance program (similar to the one the ACA implemented on a temporary basis through 2016, and that Alaska created for 2017. Several other states have since implemented reinsurance programs). The reinsurance program, which took effect in Minnesota in 2018, covers a portion of the claims that insurers face, resulting in lower total claims costs for the insurers, and thus lower premiums (average individual market premiums in Minnesota decreased from 2017 to 2018 as a result of the reinsurance program). The reinsurance kicks in once claims reach $50,000, and covers them at 80 percent up to $250,000 (this is similar to the coverage under the transitional reinsurance program that the ACA provided from 2014 through 2016).H.F.5 was contingent upon approval of the 1332 waiver, because it relies partially on federal funding, in addition to state funding. Under the federal approval that was granted in September 2017, the federal government is giving Minnesota the money that they save on premium tax credits, and that money is combined with state funds to implement the reinsurance program (lower premiums — as a result of the reinsurance program — result in the federal government having to pay a smaller total amount of premium tax credits, since the tax credits are smaller when premiums are smaller).It was expected that CMS would approve the state’s 1332 waiver proposal, and Governor Dayton requested that the approval process be swift so that the state could move forward with the implementation of the Minnesota Premium Security Plan in time for the 2018 plan year.

Dayton indicated that his office had been told that approval would come in August 2017, but CMS didn’t approve the waiver until September 22. And the waiver approval letter noted that the federal savings for MinnesotaCare (the state’s Basic Health Program, or BHP) resulting from the reinsurance program would not be eligible to be passed along to the state — in other words, CMS would keep those savings instead.[Federal BHP funding is equal to 95 percent of the amount that the federal government would have otherwise spent on premium subsidies and cost-sharing reductions for the population that ends up being eligible for the BHP. So lower premiums — as a result of reinsurance — for qualified health plans in the exchange means that the amount the federal government would have had to spend on premium subsidies for that population is lower. That translates into a smaller amount of funding for the state’s BHP, according to the approach that HHS took for Minnesota’s waiver approval.]And based on the scathing letter that Dayton sent CMS a few days earlier, it appeared at that point that Minnesota could actually lose money on the deal — losing more in federal funding for MinnesotaCare than they gain in reinsurance funding. Dayton noted in his letter that the 1332 waiver approval process had been “nightmarish,” and that Minnesota went to great lengths to follow instructions from CMS at every turn, throughout the process of drafting H.F.5 and the 1332 waiver proposal.

He explains that CMS provided Minnesota with explicit guidance in terms of how to draft the reinsurance program while maintaining full federal funding for MinnesotaCare, and highlighted the fact that the state never deviated from the instructions that were provided.The StarTribune editorial board called out then-Secretary of HHS, Tom Price and the Trump Administration for their lack of clarity on the issue, for apparently misleading the state during the 1332 waiver drafting process, and for effectively punishing the state of Minnesota for taking an innovative approach to ensuring that as many people as possible have health insurance.Insurers filed rates based on reinsurance being available. And by the time the waiver was approved, there was very little time to evaluate the potential impacts of the funding changes, as rates had to be finalized by October 2 in Minnesota. The finalized rates did incorporate the reinsurance program. The state has accepted the approved waiver, but Gov. Dayton sent a letter to HHS on October 3, asking them to reconsider the MinnesotaCare funding cuts, but the issue has remained unresolved.Elimination of CSR funding results in additional funding cut for MinnesotaCare, but a lawsuit has partially restored that fundingNationwide, 54 percent of exchange enrollees benefit from cost-sharing subsidies.

But in Minnesota, only 13 percent of exchange enrollees are receiving cost-sharing subsidies. This is because of MinnesotaCare, which covers all enrollees with income up to 200 percent of the poverty level. That’s the same group that would otherwise benefit the most from cost-sharing subsidies, so the fact that MinnesotaCare is available means that most of the people who would otherwise be enrolled in cost-sharing subsidy plans are instead enrolled in MinnesotaCare.At first glance, this would appear to have made the uncertainty surrounding cost-sharing subsidy funding in 2017 a little less of a pressing issue in Minnesota than it was in many other states, since private insurers weren’t facing the sort of losses that insurers in other states were facing without federal funding for CSR. But when the Trump Administration eliminated federal funding for CSR in October 2017, HHS took the position tha t since CSR funding had been eliminated, the CSR portion of the federal funding for the BHPs in New York and Minnesota would be reduced to $0. This was not a cut-and-dried conclusion, however, as explained earlier in 2017 by Michael Kalina.In January 2018, the Attorneys General for New York and Minnesota filed a lawsuit against the US Department of Health and Human Services, seeking to restore funding for their Basic Health Programs.

A judge ruled in favor of the states in May 2018, ensuring that MinnesotaCare would continue to receive at least some CSR-based funding. The amount awarded to the state for the first quarter of 2018 was just over half of what the state had initially expected in CSR-related funding, but a larger chuck of the funding was restored later in 2018. According to the Star Tribune, however, Minnesota still ended up losing $161 million in federal funding for MinnesotaCare due to the CSR funding cuts.In early 2019, the Trump administration proposed yet another funding cut (a third, after the cuts imposed by the reinsurance program and the elimination of CSR funding) as part of a new methodology for calculating BHP funding. This one was much smaller than the other two cuts, but taken together the funding reductions are pushing MinnesotaCare towards a looming budget shortfall. SHOP exchange.

Down to one carrier as of 2016, zero by 2018 (and still zero in 2019)In 2015, there were two carriers in MNsure’s SHOP exchange for small businesses. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, and Medica. But Medica announced in 2015 that they would exit the SHOP exchange in Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin at the end of the year. That left BCBS as the only small group carrier available through MNsure in 2016, but it didn’t change much from a practical standpoint, since 83 percent of MNsure’s small groups were enrolled in plans through BCBS in 2015. Indeed, Medica’s reason for exiting the small business exchange was based on low enrollment in the first two years.Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota continued to be the only insurer offering SHOP coverage via MNsure in 2017, but announced in July 2017 that they would no longer offer SHOP coverage in 2018, and would instead transition their SHOP enrollees to small business coverage outside the exchange.

At that point, there were only 3,287 people enrolled in SHOP coverage in Minnesota — far below the 155,000 people that were originally projected to have coverage through MNsure’s SHOP program by 2016 (this much lower-than-anticipated enrollment has been the case in nearly every state’s SHOP exchange. This situation is not unique to Minnesota). State law provided 25% premium rebate in 2017. Amendment to allow plans without essential benefits was cut from final legislationThroughout 2016, then-Governor Dayton called for a state-funded premium rebate for people who buy their own insurance but aren’t eligible for the ACA’s premium subsidies (those are only available for people with income up to 400 percent of the poverty level, or $100,400 for a family of four in 2019).Governor Dayton also noted that the government needed to act quickly to stabilize the individual market in Minnesota, and by late November 2016, his patience with lawmakers was wearing thin. In a November 23 press conference, Dayton said that House Republicans needed to “stop dilly-dallying” and decide whether to move forward with Dayton’s rebate proposal.Dayton had also indicated that he was considering calling a special session of the legislature after election day to address the situation, and that was being negotiated for December 20.

But the talks fell through when Dayton and Republican House Speaker Kurt Daudt couldn’t agree on the three bills that would have been addressed in the special session. As a result, there was no special session.Instead, the issue was taken up by lawmakers as soon as the 2017 legislative session began. On January 5, Minnesota Senators Michelle Benson (R, 31st District) and Gary Dahms (R, 16th District) introduced S.F.1. The bill called for using $300 million in state funding to provide a 25 percent rebate to roughly 125,000 people in Minnesota.S.F.1 passed the Minnesota Senate by a 35-31 vote on January 12. Only one DFL Senator (Melisa Franzen, from Edina) voted with Republicans in favor of the legislation.

It was then sent to the House, where an amendment was added that stripped out the requirement that health plans provide various mandated benefits (see “Journal of the Day” section “Top of page 154” in this version of the bill. Under the terms of the amendment, as long as a carrier offered at least one plan with all the mandated benefits, they would have been allowed to offer others without mandated benefits).The amended bill was sent back to the Senate on January 23. Differences between the bills that the two chambers passed had to be reconciled before being sent to Governor Dayton for his signature. By that point, the amendment to allow less-robust plans to be sold had garnered national attention, and public outrage helped to push lawmakers away from the provision. S.F.1 had also called for $150 million to be appropriated for fiscal year 2018 (through June 30, 2019) from the state general fund to a state-based reinsurance program to stabilize the individual market (Alaska did something similar in 2016, preventing a market collapse), but that provision was also removed in the final version (Minnesota did ultimately set up a reinsurance program, effective in 2018, which has served to stabilize the market and reduce premiums).A Conference Committee in the Senate recommended that the House “recede from its amendments” and the Conference Committee report passed the Senate on a 47-19 vote.

The House passed the bill a few hours later, 108-19. It was sent to Governor Dayton, who immediately signed it into law. DFLers did have to compromise on one issue during the process. S.F.1 allows for-profit HMOs to begin operating in Minnesota’s individual market, which had long been limited to non-profit HMOs.Consumers were told to expect the premium rebates to show up by April 2017, but they were retroactively effective to January 2017. So a person who had been paying full price for a plan since January 2017 saw a substantial premium reduction on the April or May invoice.

Going forward, for the remainder of the year, a 25 percent rebate applied each month.Since S.F.1 was signed into law with only a few days remaining in open enrollment (it ended January 31 that year), Governor Dayton and exchange officials were worried that there wouldn’t be enough time for people to learn about the rebate and apply for coverage before January 31. In December, Dayton had asked HHS to allow MNsure to extend its enrollment deadline to February 28 (instead of January 31) in order to allow lawmakers more time to work out the details of a state-based premium rebate while still allowing people to enroll after the legislative process is complete.HHS denied the request for a blanket extension, but MNsure used their own authority on January 28 to grant a one-week special enrollment period (February 1 to February 8) due to exceptional circumstances. Although the state-based 25 percent premium rebate was available on or off the exchange, the one-week extension was only valid through MNsure. Health insurers did not have to accept off-exchange enrollments without a qualifying event after January 31.The 25 percent premium rebate program in Minnesota was only authorized for one year, so the rebates did not continue into 2018. And although almost 100,000 people received premium relief through the program in 2017, it ended up costing less than the legislature had allocated, and about $100 million was returned to the state’s budget at the end of 2017.Protecting Medicaid enrollees from estate liensIn every state, Medicaid is jointly funded by the state and the federal government.

Longstanding federal regulations, which predate the ACA, require states to “seek recovery of payments from the individual’s estate for nursing facility services, home and community-based services, and related hospital and prescription drug services” for any Medicaid enrollee over the age of 55. This applies essentially to long-term care services, but states also have the option to go after the individual’s estate to recover costs for other care that was provided by Medicaid after age 55.Prior to 2014, this wasn’t typically an issue, as Medicaid eligibility was generally restricted by asset tests or requirements that applicants be disabled or pregnant (although Minnesota did have much more generous Medicaid eligibility guidelines than most states prior to 2014). But as of 2014, in states that expanded Medicaid under the ACA, the only eligibility guideline is income. Applicants with income that doesn’t exceed 138 percent of the poverty level are directed to Medicaid, regardless of any assets they might have.When applicants use the health insurance exchange — MNsure in Minnesota — they’re automatically funneled into Medical Assistance (Medicaid) if their income is under 138 percent of the poverty level. But what these enrollees didn’t know was that the state also had a program in place to put liens on estates for Medicaid-provided services for people age 55 and older.The combination of these systems caught numerous residents off guard.

They were enrolled in Medical Assistance through MNsure based on their income, but were not aware that liens were being placed on their homes so that the state could recoup the costs upon their deaths.State Senator Tony Lourey (DFL, District 11) addressed the issue with language included in HF2749, the Omnibus supplemental budget bill, which was signed into law by Governor Dayton on June 1, 2016. The legislation limits estate recovery to just what’s required under federal Medicaid rules (ie, essentially, long-term care costs for people age 55 or older), and makes the provision retroactive to January 1, 2014.Early tech strugglesMNsure opened for business in the fall of 2013, but technological issues persisted well into 2015, despite numerous improvements throughout 2014. Given MNsure’s difficult launch, the state conducted a series of audits and reviews. The first audit reviewed how MNsure spent state and federal money. Auditors concluded that the exchange has generally adequate internal controls and found no fraud or abuse.

The review was conducted by the state Office of the Legislative Auditor, and the report was published in October 2014.Another audit, also conducted by the Office of the Legislative Auditor and released in November 2014, found that the MNsure system in some cases incorrectly determined who qualified for public health benefits. The errors occurred during the first open enrollment period, before a series of system fixes were implemented. The audit did not quantify the total financial impact of the errors. The state Human Services commissioner said a consultant working on technical fixes to MNsure concluded that the eligibility functionality was working correctly as of June 2014.A third audit, a performance evaluation report released in February 2015, said “MNsure’s failures outweighed its achievements.” Among other criticisms, auditors said MNsure staff withheld information from the board of directors and state officials, the enrollment website was seriously flawed and launched without adequate testing, and the first-year enrollment target was unrealistically low.In April 2014, MNsure hired Deloitte Consulting to audit MNsure’s technology and improve the website to make enrolling in coverage and updating life events easier and more streamlined. Deloitte has been involved in successful state-run marketplaces for Connecticut, Kentucky, Rhode Island and Washington.Software upgrades were installed in August 2014, and system testing continued right up until the start of open enrollment.

To reduce wait times for consumers and insurance professionals, MNsure increased its call center and support staff and launched a dedicated service line for agents and brokers.More in-person assisters were available in Minnesota for the 2015 open enrollment period. MNsure encourages residents to utilize the exchange’s assister directory to find local navigators and brokers who can help with the enrollment process.MNsure has improved dramatically in terms of its technology since the early days of ACA implementation, and enrollment increased every year from 2014 through 2019.Lawmakers approved switching to HealthCare.gov as of 2019, but governor vetoedOn May 9, 2017, lawmakers in Minnesota passed SF800, an omnibus health and human services bill. Among many other things, the legislation called for switching from MNsure to the federally-run marketplace (HealthCare.gov) starting in 2019 (see Section 5). But Governor Dayton vetoed it.Gov. Dayton has long been supportive of MNsure, and had previously clarified that he would veto the bill.

In noting his plans to veto the legislation, Dayton made no mention of the transition to HealthCare.gov that was included in the legislation, but focused instead on the sharp budget cuts in the bill. But his veto ensured that MNsure would remain in place, at least for the time being.The Senate’s original version of SF800 did not call for scrapping MNsure, but the bill went through considerable back-and-forth between the two chambers, and the version that passed was the 4th engrossment of the bill.In March 2015, Dayton had asked the legislature to create a Task Force on Health Care Financing that would study MNsure along with possible future alternatives. Dayton noted in his letter that he supported making MNsure “directly accountable to the governor and subject to the same legislative oversight as other state agencies” and his budget included half a million dollars devoted to the task force. The spending bill was approved by the legislature in May, and the 29-member task force was appointed in the summer.One of the possibilities that the task force considered was the possibility of switching to Healthcare.gov, but it’s clear that there was no cut-and-dried answer to the question of whether Minnesota is better served by having a state-run exchange, switching to a federally-run exchange, or teaming up with the federal government on either a supported state-based marketplace or partnership exchange.In a December 2015 meeting of the task force, the MN Department of Human Services presented a financial analysis of the alternatives available to MNsure. They determined that switching entirely to Healthcare.gov would cost the state an additional $5.1 million in one-time costs from June 2016 to June 2017.

And switching to a supported state-based marketplace would cost an additional $6.6 million during that same time frame. If the state had opted to switch to Healthcare.gov, the soonest it could have happened was 2018, since HHS requires a year’s notice from states wishing to transition to Healthcare.gov, and Minnesota wouldn’t have been in a position to make a decision until sometime in 2016.There were significant reservations about making that switch prior to the Supreme Court’s ruling on King v. Burwell. The Court ruled in June 2015 that subsidies are legal in every state, including those that use Healthcare.gov. Prior to the decision, a switch to Healthcare.gov could have jeopardized subsidies for tens of thousands of Minnesota residents.

But once it was clear that Healthcare.gov’s subsidies are safe, some stakeholders began calling for Minnesota to scrap its state-run exchange and use Healthcare.gov instead. Because the MNsure task force was included in the 2016 budget, no hasty decisions were made.In January 2016, the task force submitted their recommendations to the legislature. They covered a broad range of issues, but did not recommend that MNsure transition to the federal enrollment platform. Lawmakers essentially left the exchange alone during the 2016 legislative session.The magnitude of the 2016 rate increases that were announced in October resulted in MNsure opponents renewing their calls to switch to Healthcare.gov. But it’s important to keep in mind that the 41 percent weighted average rate hike in Minnesota was market-wide, and did not just apply to MNsure enrollees.

In fact, the off-exchange carrier (PreferredOne) had among the highest rate hikes in the state for 2016, at 39 percent, and the exchange’s weighted average rate increase (38.5 percent) was lower than the weighted average rate increase for the whole individual market (41 percent).Minnesota health insurance exchange linksMNsure855-3MNSURE (855-366-7873)State Exchange Profile. MinnesotaThe Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation overview of Minnesota’s progress toward creating a state health insurance exchange.Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts..

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17 October 2020 NHS England is consulting on a proposal to enable biomedical scientists visit this page to use patient group what works like viagra directions (PGDs) to supply and administer medicines to their patients. To help ensure patients receive the right treatment and at the right time, the proposals have been put together in collaboration with the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland governments following a scoping project. Undertaken in 2015, NHS England looked at the need for some regulated health professions to supply, administer and prescribe medicines to their patients.All the proposals aim to make it more convenient and safer for patients to get the medicines they need as and when they what works like viagra need them and to reduce the need for appointments with additional health professionals, which often results in unnecessary delays to the start of their treatment.The consultations will run from 15 October 2020 to 10 December 2020 and will include an engagement event for biomedical scientists taking place online on 10 November 2020. Further detailsThe full consultation guides, supporting documents, links to the individual consultation surveys and details of the online events can be accessed via the NHS England Consultation Hub website.6 October 2020 The Royal College of Pathologists has awarded David Wells an Honorary Fellowship for his collaborative and patient centred approach David Wells, IBMS Chair of Membership and Marketing Committee and also London Region Council Member, has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from The Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath).RCPath recognised that David's roles in the IBMS makes him part of a practice leadership group that has supported the profession through a time of huge changes and through great pressure and transformation during the recent viagra. As Head of Pathology Services Consolidation at NHS England and NHS Improvement, RCPath recognised that David has helped to drive change in UK pathology that has attracted global attention, what works like viagra especially due to his excellent work with networking and consolidation.

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17 October 2020 NHS England is consulting on a proposal to enable biomedical scientists http://sw.keimfarben.de/kamagra-100mg-gold-price/ to buy viagra online canada use patient group directions (PGDs) to supply and administer medicines to their patients. To help ensure patients receive the right treatment and at the right time, the proposals have been put together in collaboration with the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland governments following a scoping project. Undertaken in 2015, NHS England looked at the need for some regulated health professions to supply, administer and prescribe medicines to their patients.All the proposals aim to make it more convenient and safer for patients to get the medicines they need as and when they need them and to reduce the need for appointments with additional health professionals, which often results in buy viagra online canada unnecessary delays to the start of their treatment.The consultations will run from 15 October 2020 to 10 December 2020 and will include an engagement event for biomedical scientists taking place online on 10 November 2020. Further detailsThe full consultation guides, supporting documents, links to the individual consultation surveys and details of the online events can be accessed via the NHS England Consultation Hub website.6 October 2020 The Royal College of Pathologists has awarded David Wells an Honorary Fellowship for his collaborative and patient centred approach David Wells, IBMS Chair of Membership and Marketing Committee and also London Region Council Member, has been awarded an Honorary Fellowship from The Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath).RCPath recognised that David's roles in the IBMS makes him part of a practice leadership group that has supported the profession through a time of huge changes and through great pressure and transformation during the recent viagra.

As Head of Pathology Services Consolidation at NHS England and NHS Improvement, RCPath recognised that David has helped to drive change in UK pathology that has attracted global attention, especially due to his excellent work buy viagra online canada with networking and consolidation. He strives to embed pathology into the heart of healthcare by supporting the adoption of digital systems, while also influencing key national health policies and government-funded initiatives. His approach to the modernisation of the field is ensuring the sustainability of pathology expertise for the future – but he still manages to find time to buy viagra online canada inspire future laboratory medicine professionals. RCPath also acknowledged that David has worked with the College to ensure that the Carter reorganisation and consolidation plans are sensibly implemented, achieving the aims of savings, but keeping an eye on the preservation of specialist services and training and development.

Finally, it was noted that David works with pathologists and scientists to ensure buy viagra online canada the highest standards of professionalism are maintained. He has a collaborative and patient centred approach that is highly valued by all who work with him.On his Honorary Fellowship, David Wells commented:It is a huge honour to be recognised for my contribution to Pathology by the Royal College of Pathologists, and humbling to be considered worthy of this distinction and recognition within a field I am hugely passionate about. Having started my career as a medical laboratory assistant and working my way up through all grades and positions, I would encourage all working within biomedical science to set their sights high and strive to contribute all they can to take our profession forward..

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A broadly neutralising antibody viagra at walgreens to prevent HIV transmissionTwo HIV prevention trials (HVTN 704/HPTN 085. HVTN 703/HPTN 081) enrolled 2699 at-risk cisgender men and transgender persons in the Americas and Europe and 1924 at-risk women in sub-Saharan Africa who were randomly assigned to receive the broadly neutralising antibody (bnAb) VRC01 or placebo (10 infusions at an interval of 8 weeks). Moderate-to-severe adverse events related to VRC01 were viagra at walgreens uncommon. In a prespecified pooled analysis, over 20 months, VRC01 offered an estimated prevention efficacy of ~75% against VRC01-sensitive isolates (30% of viagraes circulating in the trial regions).

However, VRC01 viagra at walgreens did not prevent with other HIV isolates and overall HIV acquisition compared with placebo. The data provide proof of concept that bnAb can prevent HIV acquisition, although the approach is limited by viral diversity and potential selection of resistant isolates.Corey L, Gilbert PB, Juraska M, et al. Two randomized trials viagra at walgreens of neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. N Engl J Med.

2021;384:1003–1014.Seminal cytokine profiles are associated with the risk of HIV transmissionInvestigators analysed a panel of 34 cytokines/chemokines in viagra at walgreens blood and semen of men (predominantly men who have sex with men) with HIV, comparing 21 who transmitted HIV to their partners and 22 who did not. Overall, 47% of men had a recent HIV , 19% were on antiretroviral therapy and 84% were viraemic. The cytokine profile in seminal fluid, but not in blood, differed significantly between transmitters and non-transmitters, with transmitters showing viagra at walgreens higher seminal concentrations of interleukin 13 (IL-13), IL-15 and IL-33, and lower concentrations of interferon‐gamma, IL-15, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-17, granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), IL-4, IL-16 and eotaxin. Although limited, the findings suggest that the seminal milieu modulates the risk of HIV transmission, providing a potential development opportunity for HIV prevention strategies.Vanpouille C, Frick A, Rawlings SA, et al.

Cytokine network and sexual HIV transmission in men who have sex with men viagra at walgreens. Clin Infect Dis. 2020;71:2655–2662.The challenge of estimating global treatment eligibility for chronic hepatitis B from incomplete datasetsWorldwide, over 250 million people are viagra at walgreens estimated to live with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), although only ~11% is diagnosed and a minority receives antiviral therapy. An estimate of the global proportion eligible for treatment was not previously available.

A systematic review analysed studies of CHB populations done between 2007 and 2018 to estimate the prevalence of cirrhosis, abnormal alanine aminotransferase, hepatitis B viagra DNA >2000 or >20 000 IU/mL, hepatitis B e-antigen, and overall eligibility viagra at walgreens for treatment as per WHO and other guidelines. The pooled treatment eligibility estimate was 19% (95% CI 18% to 20%), with about 10% requiring urgent treatment due to cirrhosis. However, the estimate should be interpreted with caution due to incomplete data acquisition and reporting in available viagra at walgreens studies. Standardised reporting is needed to improve global and regional estimates of CHB treatment eligibility and guide effective policy formulation.Tan M, Bhadoria AS, Cui F, et al.

Estimating the proportion of people with viagra at walgreens chronic hepatitis B viagra eligible for hepatitis B antiviral treatment worldwide. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Gastroenterol viagra at walgreens Hepatol, 2021. 6:106–119.Broad geographical disparity in the contribution of HIV to the burden of cervical cancerThis systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the contribution of HIV to the global and regional burden of cervical cancer using data from 24 studies which included 236 127 women with HIV.

HIV markedly increased the risk of cervical cancer (pooled relative risk 6.07 viagra at walgreens. 95% CI 4.40 to 8.37). In 2018, 4.9% (95% CI 3.6% to 6.4%) viagra at walgreens of cervical cancers were attributable to HIV globally, although the population-attributable fraction for HIV varied geographically, reaching 21% (95% CI 15.6% to 26.8%) in the African region. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable.

Efforts are viagra at walgreens needed to expand access to HPV vaccination in sub-Saharan Africa. More immediately, there is an urgent need to integrate cervical cancer screening within HIV services.Stelzle D, Tanaka LF, Lee KK, et al. Estimates of viagra at walgreens the global burden of cervical cancer associated with HIV. Lancet Glob Health.

2020. 9:e161–69.The complex relationship between serum vitamin D and persistence of high-risk human papilloma viagra Most cervical high-risk human papilloma viagra (hrHPV) s are transient and those that persist are more likely to progress to cancer. Based on the proposed immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D, a longitudinal study examined the association between serum concentrations of five vitamin D biomarkers and short-term persistent (vs transient or sporadic) detection of hrHPV in 72 women who collected monthly cervicovaginal swabs over 6 months. No significant associations were detected in the primary analysis.

In sensitivity analyses, after multiple adjustments, serum concentrations of multiple vitamin D biomarkers were positively associated with the short-term persistence of 14 selected hrHPV types. The relationship between vitamin D and hrHPV warrants closer examination. Studies should have longer follow-up, include populations with more diverse vitamin D concentrations and account for vitamin D supplementation.Troja C, Hoofnagle AN, Szpiro A, et al. Understanding the role of emerging vitamin D biomarkers on short-term persistence of high-risk HPV among mid-adult women.

J Infect Dis 2020. Online ahead of printPublished in STI—the editor’s choice. One in five cases of with Neisseria gonorrhoeae clear spontaneouslyStudies have indicated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) s can resolve spontaneously without antibiotic therapy. A substudy of a randomised trial investigated 405 untreated subjects (71% men) who underwent both pretrial and enrolment NG testing at the same anatomical site (genital, pharyngeal and rectal).

Based on nuclear acid amplification tests, 83 subjects (20.5%) showed clearance of the anatomical site within a median of 10 days (IQR 7–15) between tests. Those with spontaneous clearance were less likely to have concurrent chlamydia (p=0.029) and dysuria (p=0.035), but there were no differences in age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status, number of previous NG episodes, and symptoms other than dysuria between those with and without clearance. Given the high rate of spontaneous resolution, point-of-care NG testing should be considered to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment.Mensforth S, Ayinde OC, Ross J. Spontaneous clearance of genital and extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Data from GToG. STI 2020. 96:556–561.BackgroundReproductive aged women are at risk of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted s (STI). The modern contraceptive prevalence among married and unmarried women in South Africa is 54% and 64%, respectively, with injectable progestins being most widely used.1 Moreover, current global efforts aim towards all women having access to a range of reliable contraceptives options.2 The prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea are high among women in Africa, particularly among younger women.

A recent meta-analysis of over 37 000 women estimated prevalences for chlamydia and gonorrhoea by region and population type (South Africa clinic/community-based, Eastern Africa higher-risk and Southern/Eastern Africa clinic community-based). High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences were found among 15–24 year-old South African women and high risk populations in East Africa.3 Both chlamydia and gonorrhoea are associated with numerous comorbidities including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility, increased risk of HIV and other STIs, as well as significant social harm.4While STIs are a significant global health burden, data on STI prevalence by gender and drivers of are limited, hindering an effective public health response.5 Moreover, data on the association between contraceptive use and risk of non-HIV STIs are limited. The WHO recently reported stagnation in efforts to decrease global STI incidence.5 Understanding drivers of STI acquisition, including any possible associations with widely used contraceptive methods, is necessary to effectively target public health responses that reduce STI incidence and associated comorbidities.The ECHO Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT02550067) was a multicentre, open-label randomised trial of 7829 HIV-seronegative women seeking effective contraception in Eswatini, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia.

Detailed trial methods and results have been published.6 7 We conducted a secondary analysis of ECHO trial data to evaluate absolute and relative chlamydia and gonorrhoea final visit prevalences among women randomised to intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant.MethodsStudy design, participants and ethicsWomen were enrolled in the ECHO trial from December 2015 through September 2017. Institutional review boards at each site approved the study protocol and women provided written informed consent before any study procedures. In brief, women who were not pregnant, HIV-seronegative, aged 16–35 years, seeking effective contraception, without medical contraindications, willing to use the assigned method for 18 months, reported not using injectable, intrauterine or implantable contraception for the previous 6 months and reported being sexually active, were enrolled. At every visit, participants received HIV risk reduction counselling, HIV testing and STI management, condoms and, as it became a part of national standard of care, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Counselling messages related to HIV risk were implemented consistently across the three groups throughout the trial.6The trial was implemented in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent was obtained from participants or their parents/guardians and human experimentation guidelines of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and those of the authors' institution(s) were followed.Contraceptive exposureAt enrolment, women were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to DMPA-IM, copper IUD or LNG implant.6 Participants received an injection of 150 mg/mL DMPA-IM (Depo Provera. Pfizer, Puurs, Belgium) at enrolment and every 3 months until the final visit at 18 months after enrolment, a copper IUD (Optima TCu380A. Injeflex, Sao Paolo, Brazil) or a LNG implant (Jadelle.

Bayer, Turku, Finland) at enrolment. Women returned for follow-up visits at 1 month after enrolment to address initial contraceptive side-effects and every 3 months thereafter, for up to 18 months with later enrolling participants contributing 12 to 18 months of follow-up. Visits included HIV serological testing, contraceptive counselling, syndromic STI management and safety monitoring.STI outcomesThe primary outcomes of this secondary analysis were prevalent chlamydia and gonorrhoea at the final visit. Syndromic STI management was provided at screening and all follow-up visits.

Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was conducted at screening and final visits, at the visit of HIV detection for participants who became HIV infected and at clinical discretion. Any untreated participants with positive NAAT results were contacted to return to the study clinic for treatment.CovariatesAt baseline (inclusive of screening and enrolment visits), we collected demographic, sexual and reproductive risk behaviour and reproductive and contraceptive history data. Baseline risk factors evaluated as covariates included age, whether the participant earned her own income, chlamydia and gonorrhoea status, herpes simplex viagra type 2 (HSV-2) sero-status and suspected PID. Final visit factors evaluated as covariates included number of sex partners in the past 3 months, number of new sex partners in the past 3 months, HIV serostatus, HSV-2 serostatus, condom use in the past 3 months, sex exchanged for money/gifts, sex during vaginal bleeding, follow-up time and number of pelvic examinations during follow-up.

Age and HSV-2 serostatus were evaluated for effect measure modification.Statistical analysisWe conducted analyses using R V.3.5.3 (Vienna, Austria), and log-binomial regression to estimate chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences within each contraceptive group and pairwise prevalence ratios (PR) between each arm in as-randomised and consistent use analyses.In the as-randomised analysis, we analysed participants by the contraceptive method assigned at randomisation independent of method adherence. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and study site and pairwise adjusted PRs.In the consistent use analysis, we only included women who initiated use of their randomised contraceptive method and maintained randomised method adherence throughout follow-up. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and pairwise adjusted PRs, with evaluation of age and HSV-2 status first as potential effect measure modifiers, and all covariates above as potential confounders. Study site and age were retained in the final model.

Other covariates were retained if their inclusion in the base model led to a 10% change in the effect estimate through backwards selection.Supplementary analysesAdditional supporting analyses to assess postrandomisation potential sources of bias were conducted to inform interpretation of results. These include evaluation of recent sexual behaviour at enrolment, month 9 and the final visit. Cohort participation (ie, follow-up time, early discontinuation and timing of randomised method discontinuation) and health outcomes (ie, final visit HIV and HSV-2 status) and frequency and results of pelvic examinations by STI status, site and visit month by randomised arm.ResultsA total of 7829 women were randomly assigned as follows. 2609 to the DMPA-IM group, 2607 to the copper IUD group and 2613 to the LNG implant group (figure 1).

Participants were excluded if they were HIV positive at enrolment, did not have at least one HIV test or did not have chlamydia and gonorrhoea test results at the final visit. Overall, 90%, 94% and 93% from the DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant groups, respectively, were included in analyses.Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device.

LNG, levonorgestrel." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device. LNG, levonorgestrel.Participant characteristicsBaseline characteristics were similar across groups (table 1).

Nearly two-third of enrolled women (63%) were aged 24 and younger and 5768 (74%) of the study population resided in South Africa.View this table:Table 1 Participant baseline and final visit characteristicsThe duration of participation averaged 16 months with no differences between randomised groups (table 1). A total of 1468 (19%) women either did not receive their randomised method or discontinued use during follow-up. Overall method continuation rates were high with minimal differences between randomised groups when measured by person-years.6 The proportion, however, of method non-adherence as defined in this analysis (ie, did not receive randomised method at baseline or discontinued randomised method at any point during follow-up), was greater in the DMPA-IM group (26%), followed by the copper IUD (18%) and LNG implant (12%) groups. Timing of discontinuation also differed across methods.

During the first 6 months, method discontinuation was highest in the copper IUD group (7%) followed closely by DMPA-IM (6%) and LNG implant (4%) groups. Between 7 and 12 months of follow-up, it was highest in DMPA-IM group (15%), with equivalent proportions in the LNG implant (5%) and copper IUD (5%) groups.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visitsIn total, 18% of women had chlamydia at baseline (figure 2A) and 15% at the final visit. Among women 24 years and younger, 22% and 20% had chlamydia at baseline and final visits, respectively. Women aged 25–35 at baseline were less likely to have chlamydia at both baseline (12%) and final visits (8%) compared with younger women.

Baseline chlamydia prevalence ranged from 5% in Zambia to 28% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2B).Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures.Among all women, 5% had gonorrhoea at baseline and the final visit (figure 2C). Women aged 24 and younger were more likely to have gonorrhoea compared with women aged 25 and older at both baseline (5% vs 4%, respectively) and the final visit (6% vs 3%, respectively).

Baseline gonorrhoea prevalence ranged from 3% in Zambia and Kenya to 9% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2D). Similar prevalences were observed at the final visit.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at final visit by randomised contraceptive methodFourteen per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 15% to copper IUD and 17% to LNG implant had chlamydia at the final visit (table 2).View this table:Table 2 Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae prevalence at final visitThe prevalence of chlamydia did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and copper IUD groups (PR 0.90, 95% CI (0.79 to 1.04)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR 0.92, 95% CI (0.81 to 1.04)). Women in the DMPA-IM group, however, had a significantly lower risk of chlamydia compared with the LNG implant group (PR. 0.83, 95% CI (0.72 to 0.95)).

Findings from the consistent use analysis were similar, and neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Four per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 6% to copper IUD and 5% to LNG implant had gonorrhoea at the final visit (table 2). Gonorrhoea prevalence did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (PR. 0.79, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.03)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR. 1.18, 95% CI (0.93 to 1.49)).

Women in the DMPA-IM group had a significantly lower risk of gonorrhoea compared with women in the copper IUD group (PR. 0.67, 95% CI (0.52 to 0.87)). Results from as randomised and continuous use analyses did not differ. And again, neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Clinical assessment by randomised contraceptive methodTo assess the potential for outcome ascertainment bias, we evaluated the frequency of pelvic examinations and abdominal/pelvic pain and discharge by study arm.

Women in the copper IUD group were generally more likely to receive a pelvic examination during follow-up as compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (online supplemental appendix 1). Similarly, abdominal/pelvic pain on examination or abnormal discharge was observed most frequently in the copper IUD group. The number of pelvic examinations met the prespecified criteria for retention in the adjusted gonorrhoea model but not in the chlamydia model.Supplemental materialFrequency of syndromic symptoms and potential reAmong women who had chlamydia at baseline, 23% were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3A). Nine per cent of gonorrhoea-positive women at baseline were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3B).

Across both baseline and final visits, a minority of women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with signs and/or symptoms. Among chlamydia-positive women, only 12% presented with either abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3C). Similarly, only 15% of gonorrhoea-positive women presented with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3D).Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D).

Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain. Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D). Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain.

Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment.DiscussionWe observed differences in final prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea by contraceptive group in both as-randomised and consistent-use analyses. The DMPA-IM group had lower final visit chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences as compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups, though only the DMPA-IM versus the copper IUD comparison of gonorrhoea and DMPA-IM versus LNG implant comparison of chlamydia reached statistical significance. These are novel findings that have not previously been reported to our knowledge and were determined in a randomised trial setting with high participant retention, robust biomarker testing and high randomised method adherence. Interestingly, the copper IUD group had higher gonorrhoea and lower chlamydia prevalence compared with the LNG implant group, though neither finding was statistically significant.Two recent systematic reviews of the association between contraceptives and STIs found inconsistent and insufficient evidence on the association between the contraceptive methods under study in ECHO and chlamydia and gonorrhoea.8 9 Neither systematic review identified any randomised studies or any direct comparative evidence for DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant, thus enabling a unique scientific contribution from this secondary trial analysis.

Nonetheless, these findings should be interpreted in light of biological plausibility, as well as the design strengths and limitations of this analysis.The emerging science on the biological mechanisms underlying HIV susceptibility demonstrates the complex relationship between the infectious pathogen, the host innate and adaptive immune response and the interaction of both with the vaginal microbiome and other -omes. Data on these factors in relationship to chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition are much more limited but can be assumed to be equally complex. Vaginal microbiome composition, including microbial metabolic by-products, have been shown to significantly modify risk of HIV acquisition and to vary with exogenous hormone exposure, menstrual cycle phase, ethnicity and geography.10–12 These same biological principles likely apply to chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility. While DMPA-IM has been associated with decreased bacterial vaginosis (BV), initiation of the copper IUD has been associated with increased BV prevalence, and BV is associated with chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition.13 14 Moreover, Lactobacillus crispatus, which is less abundant in BV, has been shown to inhibit HeLa cell by Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibits growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in animal models.15 16 In addition, microbial community state types that are deficient in Lactobacillus crispatus and/or dominated by dysbiotic species are associated with inflammation, which is a driver of both STI and HIV susceptibility.

Thus, while the exact mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the presence of exogenous hormones and varying host microbiomes are unknown, it is biologically plausible that these complex factors may result in differential susceptibility to chlamydia and gonorrhoea among DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant users.An alternative explanation for these findings may be postrandomisation differences in clinical care and/or sexual behaviour. Participants in the copper IUD arm were more likely to have pelvic examinations and more likely to have discharge compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups. While interim STI testing and/or treatment were not documented, women in the copper IUD arm may have been more likely to receive syndromic STI treatment during follow-up due to more examination and observed discharge. More frequent STI treatment in the copper IUD group would theoretically lower the final visit point prevalence relative to women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant arms, suggesting that the observed lower risk of STI in the DMPA-IM arm is not due to differential examination, testing and treatment.

Differential sexual risk behaviour may also have influenced the results. As reported previously, women in the DMPA-IM group less frequently reported condomless sex and multiple partners than women in the other groups, and both DMPA-IM and LNG implant users less frequently reported new partners and sex during menses than copper IUD users.6 Statistical control of self-reported sexual risk behaviour in the consistent-use analysis may have been inadequate if self-reported sexual behaviour was inaccurately or insufficiently reported.A second alternative explanation may be differences in randomised method non-adherence, which was greater in the DMPA-IM group, compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups. Yet, the consistency of findings in the as-randomised and continuous use analyses suggests that method non-adherence had minimal effect on study outcomes. Taken as a whole, these findings indicate that there may be real differences in chlamydia and gonorrhoea risk associated with use of DMPA-IM, the copper IUD and LNG implant.

However, any true differential risk by method must be evaluated in light of the holistic benefits and risks of each method.The high observed chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among women ages 24 years and younger and among women in South Africa and Eswatini. While the ECHO study was conducted in settings of high HIV/STI incidence, enrolment criteria did not purposefully target women at highest risk of HIV/STI in the trial communities, suggesting that the observed prevalences may be broadly applicable to women seeking effective contraception in those settings. Improved approaches are needed to prevent STIs, including options for expedited partner treatment, to prevent re.As expected, few women testing positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with symptoms (12% and 15%, respectively), and a substantial proportion of women who were positive and treated at baseline were infected at the final visit despite syndromic management during the follow-up. Given that syndromic management is the standard of care within primary health facilities in most trial settings, these data suggest that a large proportion of among reproductive aged women is missed, exacerbating the burden of curable STIs and associated morbidities.

Routine access to more reliable diagnostics, like NAAT and novel point-of-care diagnostic tests, will be key to managing asymptomatic STIs and reducing STI prevalence and related morbidities in these settings.17This secondary analysis of the ECHO trial has strengths and limitations. Strengths include the randomised design with comparator groups of equal STI baseline risk. Participants had high adherence to their randomised contraceptive method.6 While all participants received standardised clinical care and counselling, the unblinded randomisation may have allowed postrandomisation differences in STI risk over time by method. It is possible that participants modified their risk-taking behaviour based on study counselling messages regarding the potential association between DMPA-IM and HIV.In conclusion, our analyses suggest that DMPA-IM users may have lower risk of chlamydia and gonorrhoea compared with LNG implant and copper IUD users, respectively.

Further investigation is warranted to better understand the mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility in the context of contraceptive use. Moreover, the high chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences in this population, independent of contraceptive method, warrants urgent attention.Key messagesThe prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhoea varied by contraceptive method in this randomised trial.High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among young women in South Africa and Eswatini.Most chlamydia and gonorrhoea s were asymptomatic. Therefore, routine access to reliable diagnostics are needed to effectively manage and prevent STIs in African women..

A broadly neutralising antibody to prevent HIV transmissionTwo http://mchtranslations.com/buy-kamagra-australia/ HIV prevention trials (HVTN 704/HPTN buy viagra online canada 085. HVTN 703/HPTN 081) enrolled 2699 at-risk cisgender men and transgender persons in the Americas and Europe and 1924 at-risk women in sub-Saharan Africa who were randomly assigned to receive the broadly neutralising antibody (bnAb) VRC01 or placebo (10 infusions at an interval of 8 weeks). Moderate-to-severe adverse buy viagra online canada events related to VRC01 were uncommon. In a prespecified pooled analysis, over 20 months, VRC01 offered an estimated prevention efficacy of ~75% against VRC01-sensitive isolates (30% of viagraes circulating in the trial regions).

However, VRC01 buy viagra online canada did not prevent with other HIV isolates and overall HIV acquisition compared with placebo. The data provide proof of concept that bnAb can prevent HIV acquisition, although the approach is limited by viral diversity and potential selection of resistant isolates.Corey L, Gilbert PB, Juraska M, et al. Two randomized trials of neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition buy viagra online canada. N Engl J Med.

2021;384:1003–1014.Seminal cytokine profiles are associated with the risk of HIV transmissionInvestigators analysed a panel of 34 cytokines/chemokines in blood and buy viagra online canada semen of men (predominantly men who have sex with men) with HIV, comparing 21 who transmitted HIV to their partners and 22 who did not. Overall, 47% of men had a recent HIV , 19% were on antiretroviral therapy and 84% were viraemic. The cytokine profile in seminal fluid, but not in blood, differed significantly between transmitters and non-transmitters, with transmitters showing higher seminal concentrations of interleukin 13 (IL-13), IL-15 and IL-33, and lower concentrations of interferon‐gamma, IL-15, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-17, granulocyte-macrophage buy viagra online canada CSF (GM-CSF), IL-4, IL-16 and eotaxin. Although limited, the findings suggest that the seminal milieu modulates the risk of HIV transmission, providing a potential development opportunity for HIV prevention strategies.Vanpouille C, Frick A, Rawlings SA, et al.

Cytokine network and sexual buy viagra online canada HIV transmission in men who have sex with men. Clin Infect Dis. 2020;71:2655–2662.The challenge of estimating global treatment eligibility for chronic hepatitis B from incomplete buy viagra online canada datasetsWorldwide, over 250 million people are estimated to live with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), although only ~11% is diagnosed and a minority receives antiviral therapy. An estimate of the global proportion eligible for treatment was not previously available.

A systematic review analysed studies of CHB populations done between 2007 and 2018 to estimate the prevalence of cirrhosis, abnormal alanine buy viagra online canada aminotransferase, hepatitis B viagra DNA >2000 or >20 000 IU/mL, hepatitis B e-antigen, and overall eligibility for treatment as per WHO and other guidelines. The pooled treatment eligibility estimate was 19% (95% CI 18% to 20%), with about 10% requiring urgent treatment due to cirrhosis. However, the estimate should be interpreted with buy viagra online canada caution due to incomplete data acquisition and reporting in available studies. Standardised reporting is needed to improve global and regional estimates of CHB treatment eligibility and guide effective policy formulation.Tan M, Bhadoria AS, Cui F, et al.

Estimating the buy viagra online canada proportion of people with chronic hepatitis B viagra eligible for hepatitis B antiviral treatment worldwide. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol, 2021 buy viagra online canada. 6:106–119.Broad geographical disparity in the contribution of HIV to the burden of cervical cancerThis systematic review and meta-analysis estimated the contribution of HIV to the global and regional burden of cervical cancer using data from 24 studies which included 236 127 women with HIV.

HIV buy viagra online canada markedly increased the risk of cervical cancer (pooled relative risk 6.07. 95% CI 4.40 to 8.37). In 2018, 4.9% (95% CI 3.6% to 6.4%) of cervical cancers buy viagra online canada were attributable to HIV globally, although the population-attributable fraction for HIV varied geographically, reaching 21% (95% CI 15.6% to 26.8%) in the African region. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable.

Efforts are needed to expand access to HPV vaccination buy viagra online canada in sub-Saharan Africa. More immediately, there is an urgent need to integrate cervical cancer screening within HIV services.Stelzle D, Tanaka LF, Lee KK, et al. Estimates of the global buy viagra online canada burden of cervical cancer associated with HIV. Lancet Glob Health.

2020. 9:e161–69.The complex relationship between serum vitamin D and persistence of high-risk human papilloma viagra Most cervical high-risk human papilloma viagra (hrHPV) s are transient and those that persist are more likely to progress to cancer. Based on the proposed immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D, a longitudinal study examined the association between serum concentrations of five vitamin D biomarkers and short-term persistent (vs transient or sporadic) detection of hrHPV in 72 women who collected monthly cervicovaginal swabs over 6 months. No significant associations were detected in the primary analysis.

In sensitivity analyses, after multiple adjustments, serum concentrations of multiple vitamin D biomarkers were positively associated with the short-term persistence of 14 selected hrHPV types. The relationship between vitamin D and hrHPV warrants closer examination. Studies should have longer follow-up, include populations with more diverse vitamin D concentrations and account for vitamin D supplementation.Troja C, Hoofnagle AN, Szpiro A, et al. Understanding the role of emerging vitamin D biomarkers on short-term persistence of high-risk HPV among mid-adult women.

J Infect Dis 2020. Online ahead of printPublished in STI—the editor’s choice. One in five cases of with Neisseria gonorrhoeae clear spontaneouslyStudies have indicated that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) s can resolve spontaneously without antibiotic therapy. A substudy of a randomised trial investigated 405 untreated subjects (71% men) who underwent both pretrial and enrolment NG testing at the same anatomical site (genital, pharyngeal and rectal).

Based on nuclear acid amplification tests, 83 subjects (20.5%) showed clearance of the anatomical site within a median of 10 days (IQR 7–15) between tests. Those with spontaneous clearance were less likely to have concurrent chlamydia (p=0.029) and dysuria (p=0.035), but there were no differences in age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status, number of previous NG episodes, and symptoms other than dysuria between those with and without clearance. Given the high rate of spontaneous resolution, point-of-care NG testing should be considered to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment.Mensforth S, Ayinde OC, Ross J. Spontaneous clearance of genital and extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Data from GToG. STI 2020. 96:556–561.BackgroundReproductive aged women are at risk of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted s (STI). The modern contraceptive prevalence among married and unmarried women in South Africa is 54% and 64%, respectively, with injectable progestins being most widely used.1 Moreover, current global efforts aim towards all women having access to a range of reliable contraceptives options.2 The prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea are high among women in Africa, particularly among younger women.

A recent meta-analysis of over 37 000 women estimated prevalences for chlamydia and gonorrhoea by region and population type (South Africa clinic/community-based, Eastern Africa higher-risk and Southern/Eastern Africa clinic community-based). High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences were found among 15–24 year-old South African women and high risk populations in East Africa.3 Both chlamydia and gonorrhoea are associated with numerous comorbidities including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility, increased risk of HIV and other STIs, as well as significant social harm.4While STIs are a significant global health burden, data on STI prevalence by gender and drivers of are limited, hindering an effective public health response.5 Moreover, data on the association between contraceptive use and risk of non-HIV STIs are limited. The WHO recently reported stagnation in efforts to decrease global STI incidence.5 Understanding drivers of STI acquisition, including any possible associations with widely used contraceptive methods, is necessary to effectively target public health responses that reduce STI incidence and associated comorbidities.The ECHO Trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT02550067) was a multicentre, open-label randomised trial of 7829 HIV-seronegative women seeking effective contraception in Eswatini, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia.

Detailed trial methods and results have been published.6 7 We conducted a secondary analysis of ECHO trial data to evaluate absolute and relative chlamydia and gonorrhoea final visit prevalences among women randomised to intramuscular depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) and a levonorgestrel (LNG) implant.MethodsStudy design, participants and ethicsWomen were enrolled in the ECHO trial from December 2015 through September 2017. Institutional review boards at each site approved the study protocol and women provided written informed consent before any study procedures. In brief, women who were not pregnant, HIV-seronegative, aged 16–35 years, seeking effective contraception, without medical contraindications, willing to use the assigned method for 18 months, reported not using injectable, intrauterine or implantable contraception for the previous 6 months and reported being sexually active, were enrolled. At every visit, participants received HIV risk reduction counselling, HIV testing and STI management, condoms and, as it became a part of national standard of care, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Counselling messages related to HIV risk were implemented consistently across the three groups throughout the trial.6The trial was implemented in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice. Informed consent was obtained from participants or their parents/guardians and human experimentation guidelines of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and those of the authors' institution(s) were followed.Contraceptive exposureAt enrolment, women were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to DMPA-IM, copper IUD or LNG implant.6 Participants received an injection of 150 mg/mL DMPA-IM (Depo Provera. Pfizer, Puurs, Belgium) at enrolment and every 3 months until the final visit at 18 months after enrolment, a copper IUD (Optima TCu380A. Injeflex, Sao Paolo, Brazil) or a LNG implant (Jadelle.

Bayer, Turku, Finland) at enrolment. Women returned for follow-up visits at 1 month after enrolment to address initial contraceptive side-effects and every 3 months thereafter, for up to 18 months with later enrolling participants contributing 12 to 18 months of follow-up. Visits included HIV serological testing, contraceptive counselling, syndromic STI management and safety monitoring.STI outcomesThe primary outcomes of this secondary analysis were prevalent chlamydia and gonorrhoea at the final visit. Syndromic STI management was provided at screening and all follow-up visits.

Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae was conducted at screening and final visits, at the visit of HIV detection for participants who became HIV infected and at clinical discretion. Any untreated participants with positive NAAT results were contacted to return to the study clinic for treatment.CovariatesAt baseline (inclusive of screening and enrolment visits), we collected demographic, sexual and reproductive risk behaviour and reproductive and contraceptive history data. Baseline risk factors evaluated as covariates included age, whether the participant earned her own income, chlamydia and gonorrhoea status, herpes simplex viagra type 2 (HSV-2) sero-status and suspected PID. Final visit factors evaluated as covariates included number of sex partners in the past 3 months, number of new sex partners in the past 3 months, HIV serostatus, HSV-2 serostatus, condom use in the past 3 months, sex exchanged for money/gifts, sex during vaginal bleeding, follow-up time and number of pelvic examinations during follow-up.

Age and HSV-2 serostatus were evaluated for effect measure modification.Statistical analysisWe conducted analyses using R V.3.5.3 (Vienna, Austria), and log-binomial regression to estimate chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences within each contraceptive group and pairwise prevalence ratios (PR) between each arm in as-randomised and consistent use analyses.In the as-randomised analysis, we analysed participants by the contraceptive method assigned at randomisation independent of method adherence. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and study site and pairwise adjusted PRs.In the consistent use analysis, we only included women who initiated use of their randomised contraceptive method and maintained randomised method adherence throughout follow-up. We estimated crude point prevalences by arm and pairwise adjusted PRs, with evaluation of age and HSV-2 status first as potential effect measure modifiers, and all covariates above as potential confounders. Study site and age were retained in the final model.

Other covariates were retained if their inclusion in the base model led to a 10% change in the effect estimate through backwards selection.Supplementary analysesAdditional supporting analyses to assess postrandomisation potential sources of bias were conducted to inform interpretation of results. These include evaluation of recent sexual behaviour at enrolment, month 9 and the final visit. Cohort participation (ie, follow-up time, early discontinuation and timing of randomised method discontinuation) and health outcomes (ie, final visit HIV and HSV-2 status) and frequency and results of pelvic examinations by STI status, site and visit month by randomised arm.ResultsA total of 7829 women were randomly assigned as follows. 2609 to the DMPA-IM group, 2607 to the copper IUD group and 2613 to the LNG implant group (figure 1).

Participants were excluded if they were HIV positive at enrolment, did not have at least one HIV test or did not have chlamydia and gonorrhoea test results at the final visit. Overall, 90%, 94% and 93% from the DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant groups, respectively, were included in analyses.Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device.

LNG, levonorgestrel." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 1 Study profile. DMPA-IM, depot medroxy progesterone acetate. IUD, intrauterine device. LNG, levonorgestrel.Participant characteristicsBaseline characteristics were similar across groups (table 1).

Nearly two-third of enrolled women (63%) were aged 24 and younger and 5768 (74%) of the study population resided in South Africa.View this table:Table 1 Participant baseline and final visit characteristicsThe duration of participation averaged 16 months with no differences between randomised groups (table 1). A total of 1468 (19%) women either did not receive their randomised method or discontinued use during follow-up. Overall method continuation rates were high with minimal differences between randomised groups when measured by person-years.6 The proportion, however, of method non-adherence as defined in this analysis (ie, did not receive randomised method at baseline or discontinued randomised method at any point during follow-up), was greater in the DMPA-IM group (26%), followed by the copper IUD (18%) and LNG implant (12%) groups. Timing of discontinuation also differed across methods.

During the first 6 months, method discontinuation was highest in the copper IUD group (7%) followed closely by DMPA-IM (6%) and LNG implant (4%) groups. Between 7 and 12 months of follow-up, it was highest in DMPA-IM group (15%), with equivalent proportions in the LNG implant (5%) and copper IUD (5%) groups.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visitsIn total, 18% of women had chlamydia at baseline (figure 2A) and 15% at the final visit. Among women 24 years and younger, 22% and 20% had chlamydia at baseline and final visits, respectively. Women aged 25–35 at baseline were less likely to have chlamydia at both baseline (12%) and final visits (8%) compared with younger women.

Baseline chlamydia prevalence ranged from 5% in Zambia to 28% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2B).Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 2 Point prevalence (per 100 persons) of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at baseline and final visit by age category and study site region. Y-axis scale differs for chlamydia and gonorrhoea figures.Among all women, 5% had gonorrhoea at baseline and the final visit (figure 2C). Women aged 24 and younger were more likely to have gonorrhoea compared with women aged 25 and older at both baseline (5% vs 4%, respectively) and the final visit (6% vs 3%, respectively).

Baseline gonorrhoea prevalence ranged from 3% in Zambia and Kenya to 9% in the Western Cape, South Africa (figure 2D). Similar prevalences were observed at the final visit.Point prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea at final visit by randomised contraceptive methodFourteen per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 15% to copper IUD and 17% to LNG implant had chlamydia at the final visit (table 2).View this table:Table 2 Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae prevalence at final visitThe prevalence of chlamydia did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and copper IUD groups (PR 0.90, 95% CI (0.79 to 1.04)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR 0.92, 95% CI (0.81 to 1.04)). Women in the DMPA-IM group, however, had a significantly lower risk of chlamydia compared with the LNG implant group (PR. 0.83, 95% CI (0.72 to 0.95)).

Findings from the consistent use analysis were similar, and neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Four per cent of women randomised to DMPA-IM, 6% to copper IUD and 5% to LNG implant had gonorrhoea at the final visit (table 2). Gonorrhoea prevalence did not significantly differ between DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (PR. 0.79, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.03)) or between copper IUD and LNG implant groups (PR. 1.18, 95% CI (0.93 to 1.49)).

Women in the DMPA-IM group had a significantly lower risk of gonorrhoea compared with women in the copper IUD group (PR. 0.67, 95% CI (0.52 to 0.87)). Results from as randomised and continuous use analyses did not differ. And again, neither age nor HSV-2 status modified the observed associations.Clinical assessment by randomised contraceptive methodTo assess the potential for outcome ascertainment bias, we evaluated the frequency of pelvic examinations and abdominal/pelvic pain and discharge by study arm.

Women in the copper IUD group were generally more likely to receive a pelvic examination during follow-up as compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups (online supplemental appendix 1). Similarly, abdominal/pelvic pain on examination or abnormal discharge was observed most frequently in the copper IUD group. The number of pelvic examinations met the prespecified criteria for retention in the adjusted gonorrhoea model but not in the chlamydia model.Supplemental materialFrequency of syndromic symptoms and potential reAmong women who had chlamydia at baseline, 23% were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3A). Nine per cent of gonorrhoea-positive women at baseline were also positive at the final visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3B).

Across both baseline and final visits, a minority of women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with signs and/or symptoms. Among chlamydia-positive women, only 12% presented with either abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3C). Similarly, only 15% of gonorrhoea-positive women presented with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain at their test-positive visit (online supplemental appendix 2, figure 3D).Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D).

Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain. Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment." data-icon-position data-hide-link-title="0">Figure 3 Potential re and symptoms among women with chlamydia or gonorrhoea. Data are pooled across the screening and final visits in figures (C) and (D). Symptomatic is defined as presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge and/or abdominal/pelvic pain.

Final visit is described as potential re because test of cure was not conducted following baseline diagnosis and treatment.DiscussionWe observed differences in final prevalences of chlamydia and gonorrhoea by contraceptive group in both as-randomised and consistent-use analyses. The DMPA-IM group had lower final visit chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences as compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups, though only the DMPA-IM versus the copper IUD comparison of gonorrhoea and DMPA-IM versus LNG implant comparison of chlamydia reached statistical significance. These are novel findings that have not previously been reported to our knowledge and were determined in a randomised trial setting with high participant retention, robust biomarker testing and high randomised method adherence. Interestingly, the copper IUD group had higher gonorrhoea and lower chlamydia prevalence compared with the LNG implant group, though neither finding was statistically significant.Two recent systematic reviews of the association between contraceptives and STIs found inconsistent and insufficient evidence on the association between the contraceptive methods under study in ECHO and chlamydia and gonorrhoea.8 9 Neither systematic review identified any randomised studies or any direct comparative evidence for DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant, thus enabling a unique scientific contribution from this secondary trial analysis.

Nonetheless, these findings should be interpreted in light of biological plausibility, as well as the design strengths and limitations of this analysis.The emerging science on the biological mechanisms underlying HIV susceptibility demonstrates the complex relationship between the infectious pathogen, the host innate and adaptive immune response and the interaction of both with the vaginal microbiome and other -omes. Data on these factors in relationship to chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition are much more limited but can be assumed to be equally complex. Vaginal microbiome composition, including microbial metabolic by-products, have been shown to significantly modify risk of HIV acquisition and to vary with exogenous hormone exposure, menstrual cycle phase, ethnicity and geography.10–12 These same biological principles likely apply to chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility. While DMPA-IM has been associated with decreased bacterial vaginosis (BV), initiation of the copper IUD has been associated with increased BV prevalence, and BV is associated with chlamydia and gonorrhoea acquisition.13 14 Moreover, Lactobacillus crispatus, which is less abundant in BV, has been shown to inhibit HeLa cell by Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibits growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in animal models.15 16 In addition, microbial community state types that are deficient in Lactobacillus crispatus and/or dominated by dysbiotic species are associated with inflammation, which is a driver of both STI and HIV susceptibility.

Thus, while the exact mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the presence of exogenous hormones and varying host microbiomes are unknown, it is biologically plausible that these complex factors may result in differential susceptibility to chlamydia and gonorrhoea among DMPA-IM, copper IUD and LNG implant users.An alternative explanation for these findings may be postrandomisation differences in clinical care and/or sexual behaviour. Participants in the copper IUD arm were more likely to have pelvic examinations and more likely to have discharge compared with women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant groups. While interim STI testing and/or treatment were not documented, women in the copper IUD arm may have been more likely to receive syndromic STI treatment during follow-up due to more examination and observed discharge. More frequent STI treatment in the copper IUD group would theoretically lower the final visit point prevalence relative to women in the DMPA-IM and LNG implant arms, suggesting that the observed lower risk of STI in the DMPA-IM arm is not due to differential examination, testing and treatment.

Differential sexual risk behaviour may also have influenced the results. As reported previously, women in the DMPA-IM group less frequently reported condomless sex and multiple partners than women in the other groups, and both DMPA-IM and LNG implant users less frequently reported new partners and sex during menses than copper IUD users.6 Statistical control of self-reported sexual risk behaviour in the consistent-use analysis may have been inadequate if self-reported sexual behaviour was inaccurately or insufficiently reported.A second alternative explanation may be differences in randomised method non-adherence, which was greater in the DMPA-IM group, compared with copper IUD and LNG implant groups. Yet, the consistency of findings in the as-randomised and continuous use analyses suggests that method non-adherence had minimal effect on study outcomes. Taken as a whole, these findings indicate that there may be real differences in chlamydia and gonorrhoea risk associated with use of DMPA-IM, the copper IUD and LNG implant.

However, any true differential risk by method must be evaluated in light of the holistic benefits and risks of each method.The high observed chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among women ages 24 years and younger and among women in South Africa and Eswatini. While the ECHO study was conducted in settings of high HIV/STI incidence, enrolment criteria did not purposefully target women at highest risk of HIV/STI in the trial communities, suggesting that the observed prevalences may be broadly applicable to women seeking effective contraception in those settings. Improved approaches are needed to prevent STIs, including options for expedited partner treatment, to prevent re.As expected, few women testing positive for chlamydia or gonorrhoea presented with symptoms (12% and 15%, respectively), and a substantial proportion of women who were positive and treated at baseline were infected at the final visit despite syndromic management during the follow-up. Given that syndromic management is the standard of care within primary health facilities in most trial settings, these data suggest that a large proportion of among reproductive aged women is missed, exacerbating the burden of curable STIs and associated morbidities.

Routine access to more reliable diagnostics, like NAAT and novel point-of-care diagnostic tests, will be key to managing asymptomatic STIs and reducing STI prevalence and related morbidities in these settings.17This secondary analysis of the ECHO trial has strengths and limitations. Strengths include the randomised design with comparator groups of equal STI baseline risk. Participants had high adherence to their randomised contraceptive method.6 While all participants received standardised clinical care and counselling, the unblinded randomisation may have allowed postrandomisation differences in STI risk over time by method. It is possible that participants modified their risk-taking behaviour based on study counselling messages regarding the potential association between DMPA-IM and HIV.In conclusion, our analyses suggest that DMPA-IM users may have lower risk of chlamydia and gonorrhoea compared with LNG implant and copper IUD users, respectively.

Further investigation is warranted to better understand the mechanisms of chlamydia and gonorrhoea susceptibility in the context of contraceptive use. Moreover, the high chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences in this population, independent of contraceptive method, warrants urgent attention.Key messagesThe prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhoea varied by contraceptive method in this randomised trial.High chlamydia and gonorrhoea prevalences, despite intensive counselling and condom provision, warrants attention, particularly among young women in South Africa and Eswatini.Most chlamydia and gonorrhoea s were asymptomatic. Therefore, routine access to reliable diagnostics are needed to effectively manage and prevent STIs in African women..

Viagra for men

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Nearly every pregnant woman will face a decision regarding medication at some pointduring their pregnancy. However, there’s not detailed information on effects of manymedications when it comes to pregnant women, because they are not included in safetystudies. What we do know, though, viagra for men is that there are some cases in which it would be more harmful to stop taking a medication during pregnancy, if, for example, the medication helps control a health condition.

On the flip side, there are also certain medications that increase the risk of birth defects, miscarriage or developmental disabilities. Certain things, such as the dose of the medication, during what trimester you take the medication and what health conditions you have, all play a role in this as well. The best thing to do is to discuss any medications you are currently taking with viagra for men yourhealth care provider.

You can do this even before you are pregnant, as there are somemedications that are unsafe in early pregnancy. Your provider will help you create atreatment plan so that you, and your baby, are as healthy and as safe as possible. Throughout your pregnancy, you’ll want to check in with your doctor before starting orstopping any new medication, and this includes prescriptions, vitamins, supplements orover-the-counter remedies viagra for men.

Even after you deliver your baby, your doctor will be able towork with you to determine if you should continue taking your medication or, when it’ssafe for you to resume taking medication you stopped taking during pregnancy. Together, you and your doctor can work together to come up with a plan to keep you and your baby as healthy and safe as possible. Obstetrician/Gynecologist Shawna Ruple, M.D., sees patients at MidMichigan viagra for men Obstetrics &.

Gynecology in Midland. Dr. Ruple specializes in routine and problem gynecology care, gynecologic surgery, prevention of female reproductive cancers, birth control options, caring for women while pregnant and more.

For more information on in-office treatments and procedures, contact her office at (989) 631-6730.These simple acts of kindness will help reduce community spread of erectile dysfunction treatment and ensure businesses, schools and hospitals can remain open to serve you!. Wear A Mask Protect yourself and others by properly wearing a mask that covers your nose and mouth at all times when in public. Learn more at MaskUpMichigan.

Stay Home Right now, staying home unless you absolutely need to go out is one of the best ways to help flatten the curve. When you do go out for work, groceries or exercise, stay 6 feet apart, wear a mask and wash your hands. Celebrate Safely Public health officials cite private gatherings such as weddings, funerals and parties among the most common causes of new outbreaks.

Avoid gatherings and find safer ways to celebrate such as virtual events or dropping off food and gifts. Donate Blood With state- and nation-wide blood shortages, this is one thing you can do to directly save lives. If you are healthy with no erectile dysfunction treatment symptoms, it is still safe for you to donate blood.

Find a blood drive near you. Call Ahead for Health Care Don’t neglect your health, but do call ahead to your doctor’s office or Urgent Care so they can prepare for your visit and safely accommodate you. Or call your primary care provider to schedule a video visit.

Thank Essential WorkersIt seems simple, but a colorful sign in your yard or window, or a note of encouragement and gratitude on social media can go a long way to remind essential workers of your support.Make a DonationConsider supporting non-profit organizations that are providing erectile dysfunction treatment relief, such as securing needed medical supplies or assisting vulnerable populations..

Whether you’re thinking about getting buy viagra online canada pregnant, or you’re currently pregnant, you might be wondering how to know which medications are safe to use during your pregnancy. This includes everything from prescription medications, to over-the-counter cold remedies to your daily multivitamin. How do you know what’s safe, and what you shouldstop taking to protect yourself and buy viagra online canada your baby?. Nearly every pregnant woman will face a decision regarding medication at some pointduring their pregnancy.

However, there’s not detailed information on effects of manymedications when it comes to pregnant women, because they are not included in safetystudies. What we do know, though, buy viagra online canada is that there are some cases in which it would be more harmful to stop taking a medication during pregnancy, if, for example, the medication helps control a health condition. On the flip side, there are also certain medications that increase the risk of birth defects, miscarriage or developmental disabilities. Certain things, such as the dose of the medication, during what trimester you take the medication and what health conditions you have, all play a role in this as well.

The best thing to do is to discuss any medications you are currently taking with yourhealth care provider buy viagra online canada. You can do this even before you are pregnant, as there are somemedications that are unsafe in early pregnancy. Your provider will help you create atreatment plan so that you, and your baby, are as healthy and as safe as possible. Throughout your buy viagra online canada pregnancy, you’ll want to check in with your doctor before starting orstopping any new medication, and this includes prescriptions, vitamins, supplements orover-the-counter remedies.

Even after you deliver your baby, your doctor will be able towork with you to determine if you should continue taking your medication or, when it’ssafe for you to resume taking medication you stopped taking during pregnancy. Together, you and your doctor can work together to come up with a plan to keep you and your baby as healthy and safe as possible. Obstetrician/Gynecologist Shawna Ruple, M.D., sees patients at buy viagra online canada MidMichigan Obstetrics &. Gynecology in Midland.

Dr. Ruple specializes in routine and problem gynecology care, gynecologic surgery, prevention of female reproductive cancers, birth control options, caring for women while pregnant and more. For more information on in-office treatments and procedures, contact her office at (989) 631-6730.These simple acts of kindness will help reduce community spread of erectile dysfunction treatment and ensure businesses, schools and hospitals can remain open to serve you!. Wear A Mask Protect yourself and others by properly wearing a mask that covers your nose and mouth at all times when in public.

Learn more at MaskUpMichigan. Stay Home Right now, staying home unless you absolutely need to go out is one of the best ways to help flatten the curve. When you do go out for work, groceries or exercise, stay 6 feet apart, wear a mask and wash your hands. Celebrate Safely Public health officials cite private gatherings such as weddings, funerals and parties among the most common causes of new outbreaks.

Avoid gatherings and find safer ways to celebrate such as virtual events or dropping off food and gifts. Donate Blood With state- and nation-wide blood shortages, this is one thing you can do to directly save lives. If you are healthy with no erectile dysfunction treatment symptoms, it is still safe for you to donate blood. Find a blood drive near you.

Call Ahead for Health Care Don’t neglect your health, but do call ahead to your doctor’s office or Urgent Care so they can prepare for your visit and safely accommodate you. Or call your primary care provider to schedule a video visit. Thank Essential WorkersIt seems simple, but a colorful sign in your yard or window, or a note of encouragement and gratitude on social media can go a long way to remind essential workers of your support.Make a DonationConsider supporting non-profit organizations that are providing erectile dysfunction treatment relief, such as securing needed medical supplies or assisting vulnerable populations..

What is viagra for women

Welcome back to the latest edition what is viagra for women of the EMJ. It’s high Summer here in the Northern Hemisphere and our hopes that erectile dysfunction treatment would be a distant memory by now are sadly broken. We are in wave n+1 at the moment (where n depends what is viagra for women on where you are in the world), but there is hope in sight as treatment roll outs continue around the world.This month our Editor’s choice is the PRIEST study. This huge observational trial of erectile dysfunction treatment 19 patients presenting to UK emergency departments gave us essential information on risk assessment in the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra.

It’s a fantastic example of how a trial can be rapidly delivered in a viagra and a lesson in how we need to plan for the viagra what is viagra for women after erectile dysfunction treatment. The study is particularly useful in that it focuses on information available to the emergency clinician in the form of well-known scores such as NEWS2 as opposed to data that may be available much later (such as some laboratory testing). While therapeutic trials of repurposed drugs such as the RECOVERY and REMAP-CAP trials have received much of the publicity in the wake of erectile dysfunction treatment we must remember that as emergency clinicians it is diagnosis, prognosis, what is viagra for women risk assessment and disposition decisions that are at the core of our specialty. The PRIEST study is a great example of how this can be done in a viagra.Keeping with a erectile dysfunction treatment theme Richards et al examined the evidence for prone positioning for non-intubated hypoxic erectile dysfunction treatment patients.

Despite the millions of cases worldwide and the enthusiasm for this technique the evidence base from 31 trials is actually very poor. There are theoretical physiological advantages of course, and anecdotally short-term improvement what is viagra for women can be seen. However, it is still not clear whether this translates into important patient related outcomes. It’s clear what is viagra for women from this study that we need more data to support clinical practice and from well-designed clinical trials.Leading a cardiac arrest is a complex task that even experienced clinicians can find cognitively overwhelming.

There is the ‘in the moment’ task of sticking to an algorithm while at the same time trying to figure out a more strategic plan for the patient. Few individuals can do both effectively which is why my colleagues have been teaching the concept of splitting roles to cognitively offload the strategic leader to strategically direct what is viagra for women the arrest. I was therefore delighted to see this concept tested in the CANLEAD trial using a simulated model of cardiac arrest and nursing team leaders to run the ALS algorithm. In 20 simulations involving 120 participants they what is viagra for women found improved overall team performance.

Whether this would translate to better outcomes for patients in real world settings remains to be seen, but it has face validity and this study supports further work. It’s also a welcome reminder that nurses are perfectly capable of running cardiac arrests, and some of the best resuscitationists I know work with nurses in exactly this manner.Cardiac arrest is a condition (among others) where debriefing is important and so it’s good to see a study of the use of a structured debrief tool from Sugarman et al who report a quality improvement project looking at implementing the ‘TAKE STOCK’ tool, adapted from the Stop5 tool. QIP reports are relatively new to the journal, what is viagra for women and we hope to highlight effective and interesting projects that can make a real difference to clinical care. The QIP shows a broad welcoming of a structured approach to debriefing from all staff members, and articulates a path for their introduction.

If you are not already using a debriefing tool then this QIP may well help your department embed this important task.As I write this there is a lot of media attention in the UK regarding the number of paediatric attendances to UK emergency departments with colleagues such as Damian Roland from Leicester working hard to educate what is viagra for women the public on what fever really means in the paediatric population. While most fevers are benign we all know that it can also be a marker of and so we have two paediatric studies looking at this in August. Chong et al looked at children under 3 months which are a notoriously difficult group what is viagra for women to differentiate serious from benign disease. In their cohort the incidence of severe disease was high (33%), but there are clues in the heart rate variability, temperature, and gender may help.

In a less risky group Mallet et al have looked at the prescription of antibiotics in paediatric sore throat finding a fair amount of variability between clinician choice and more formalised scoring mechanisms. It’s a good story to remind us that research findings (in this case scoring systems) rarely perform or penetrate clinical practice in the way that what is viagra for women we would hope or anticipate.Sticking with paediatrics I was interested to read a paper that made me stop and think about my own practice for Toddler’s fractures. My approach has been symptom led varying from the rare use of plaster of Paris through splints, and often very little indeed if the patient is not distressed or in pain. This month we have a randomised controlled trial from what is viagra for women Australia comparing above knee POP to a controlled ankle motion boot.

They found that a controlled motion boot is easier to live with and allows a faster return to activities of daily living and without any healing problems. However, I’m still left wondering if either of these levels of intervention are necessary for all patients.There’s lots more in this month’s edition what is viagra for women but I’ll end with a reminder that our perceptions of emergency care may differ from those of our patients. Bull et al.’s systematic review of patient experience in the emergency department is enlightening with two major themes, one of the interactions between patients and staff and the other with the environment of the emergency department. There is much to reflect on here and perhaps time to look at our departments from the patient perspective.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required..

Welcome back how to order viagra online to the latest edition of the buy viagra online canada EMJ. It’s high Summer here in the Northern Hemisphere and our hopes that erectile dysfunction treatment would be a distant memory by now are sadly broken. We are in wave n+1 at the moment (where n depends on where you are in the world), but there is hope in sight as treatment roll outs continue buy viagra online canada around the world.This month our Editor’s choice is the PRIEST study.

This huge observational trial of erectile dysfunction treatment 19 patients presenting to UK emergency departments gave us essential information on risk assessment in the erectile dysfunction treatment viagra. It’s a fantastic example of how a trial can buy viagra online canada be rapidly delivered in a viagra and a lesson in how we need to plan for the viagra after erectile dysfunction treatment. The study is particularly useful in that it focuses on information available to the emergency clinician in the form of well-known scores such as NEWS2 as opposed to data that may be available much later (such as some laboratory testing).

While therapeutic trials of repurposed drugs such as the buy viagra online canada RECOVERY and REMAP-CAP trials have received much of the publicity in the wake of erectile dysfunction treatment we must remember that as emergency clinicians it is diagnosis, prognosis, risk assessment and disposition decisions that are at the core of our specialty. The PRIEST study is a great example of how this can be done in a viagra.Keeping with a erectile dysfunction treatment theme Richards et al examined the evidence for prone positioning for non-intubated hypoxic erectile dysfunction treatment patients. Despite the millions of cases worldwide and the enthusiasm for this technique the evidence base from 31 trials is actually very poor.

There are theoretical physiological advantages of course, and anecdotally short-term improvement can be buy viagra online canada seen. However, it is still not clear whether this translates into important patient related outcomes. It’s clear from this study that we need more data to support clinical practice and from well-designed clinical trials.Leading a cardiac arrest is buy viagra online canada a complex task that even experienced clinicians can find cognitively overwhelming.

There is the ‘in the moment’ task of sticking to an algorithm while at the same time trying to figure out a more strategic plan for the patient. Few individuals can do both effectively which is why my buy viagra online canada colleagues have been teaching the concept of splitting roles to cognitively offload the strategic leader to strategically direct the arrest. I was therefore delighted to see this concept tested in the CANLEAD trial using a simulated model of cardiac arrest and nursing team leaders to run the ALS algorithm.

In 20 simulations involving 120 participants they found improved buy viagra online canada overall team performance. Whether this would translate to better outcomes for patients in real world settings remains to be seen, but it has face validity and this study supports further work. It’s also a welcome reminder that nurses are perfectly capable of running cardiac arrests, and some of the best resuscitationists I know work with nurses in exactly this manner.Cardiac arrest is a condition (among others) where debriefing is important and so it’s good to see a study of the use of a structured debrief tool from Sugarman et al who report a quality improvement project looking at implementing the ‘TAKE STOCK’ tool, adapted from the Stop5 tool.

QIP reports are relatively new to the journal, and we hope to highlight effective and interesting projects that can make a buy viagra online canada real difference to clinical care. The QIP shows a broad welcoming of a structured approach to debriefing from all staff members, and articulates a path for their introduction. If you buy viagra online canada are not already using a debriefing tool then this QIP may well help your department embed this important task.As I write this there is a lot of media attention in the UK regarding the number of paediatric attendances to UK emergency departments with colleagues such as Damian Roland from Leicester working hard to educate the public on what fever really means in the paediatric population.

While most fevers are benign we all know that it can also be a marker of and so we have two paediatric studies looking at this in August. Chong et al looked buy viagra online canada at children under 3 months which are a notoriously difficult group to differentiate serious from benign disease. In their cohort the incidence of severe disease was high (33%), but there are clues in the heart rate variability, temperature, and gender may help.

In a less risky group Mallet et al have looked at the prescription of antibiotics in paediatric sore throat finding a fair amount of variability between clinician choice and more formalised scoring mechanisms. It’s a buy viagra online canada good story to remind us that research findings (in this case scoring systems) rarely perform or penetrate clinical practice in the way that we would hope or anticipate.Sticking with paediatrics I was interested to read a paper that made me stop and think about my own practice for Toddler’s fractures. My approach has been symptom led varying from the rare use of plaster of Paris through splints, and often very little indeed if the patient is not distressed or in pain.

This month we have a randomised controlled trial from Australia comparing above knee POP to a controlled ankle motion boot buy viagra online canada. They found that a controlled motion boot is easier to live with and allows a faster return to activities of daily living and without any healing problems. However, I’m still left wondering if either of these levels of intervention are buy viagra online canada necessary for all patients.There’s lots more in this month’s edition but I’ll end with a reminder that our perceptions of emergency care may differ from those of our patients.

Bull et al.’s systematic review of patient experience in the emergency department is enlightening with two major themes, one of the interactions between patients and staff and the other with the environment of the emergency department. There is much to reflect on here and perhaps time to look at our departments from the patient perspective.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required..

Page updated: 01.06.2010 21:00